JOHNSON


First Posted: 1/15/2009

JOHNSON
PILOT MOUNTAIN The Rev. Wayne Franklin Johnson, 68, of 188 Parkview Circle, Pilot Mountain, passed away Wednesday morning, Jan. 14, 2009, at Forsyth Medical Center in Winston-Salem. Wayne was born Feb. 27, 1940, in Surry County to the late Roy Melton and Rosa Mae Wright Johnson. He grew up in the White Plains-Red Brush community and attended White Plains School, where he graduated in 1958. He entered John Wesley College in the fall of 1959 and graduated with a bachelors degree in 1963. Then, he transferred to Guilford College, where he graduated with a B.A. degree in 1965. He graduated with a Master of Arts degree in 1969, attended the North Carolina Baptist Hospital School of Pastoral Care from 1970 until 1971, and completed his internship in social work classification in mental health. Wayne worked for New River Mental Health in Boone from 1971 to 1984, and Crossroads Mental Health in Yadkinville, Elkin and Mount Airy from 1984 to March 1, 2000. After his tenure with Crossroads, he worked in the evening hours as a private family practitioner from 1986 until his death. Wayne was recognized while working in Watauga County as starting the first substance abuse couples counseling group; worked with the first AA group; established the first employees assistance group that had 16 agencies and companies involved; established the first group and marriage counseling; established the first mental health on-call system, using ministers as volunteer workers; was identified as the first marriage and family counselor for New River Mental Health; helped to establish the first inter-agency committee involving health department of social services and New River Mental Health and Vocational Rehab; was identified as the first case manager with Crossroads Mental Health; was chairperson for the North Central Case Managers; and helped to establish the first de-toxic unit at Blowing Rock Hospital with Dr. Devant. Wayne was converted at age 13 at Union Hill Friends Meeting in Surry County and was called to the ministry at age 18. He was very committed to the cause of Christ and to Quakerism, thus pursued his pastoral duties by pastoring Forbush Meeting from 1959-1960, Deep Creek and Hunting Creek meetings from 1963-1968, Cedar Square Meeting from 1968-1971, Pilot Mountain and Westfield meetings from 1971-1983, Ararat Meeting from 1983-2000, White Plains Friends Meeting from 2000-2008 and then in 2008 he served at Deep Creek Friends until his death. Wayne still made time for his family and his hobbies of yard work, gardening and golf. He also enjoyed, antique cars, gardening and landscaping. He is survived by his wife of 43 years, Anne Covington Johnson of the home; a daughter and son-in-law, Kim and John Williams of Kernersville; a son and daughter-in-law, Scott and Jennifer Johnson of Greensboro; three grandchildren, Marjolie Jayne Johnson, Patrick Johnson and Catherine Johnson; a sister and brother-in-law, Casper Jean and Herman Thomas of Mount Airy; and two brothers and sisters-in-law, Roy M. and Dot Johnson of Lake Gaston, Va., and Ted and Martha Johnson of Pilot Mountain. The funeral service will be held Saturday, Jan. 17, 2009, at 11 a.m. at Moody Funeral Home Chapel in Mount Airy. The service will be conducted by the Rev. Ben Hurley, the Rev. Archie Creed and the Rev. Don Tickle, and burial will follow in the Whitaker Chapel United Methodist Church Cemetery. The family will receive friends Friday from 6 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home. The family would like to especially thank Deep Creek Friends Meeting for all their kindness and compassion shown during Waynes illness; to Dr. Aimee Shephard, ND, MS, ON, LAC of Kernersville; Dr. Jamie Trujillo and staff of Winston-Salem; and Dr. Thomas Grote and his staff at Forsyth Medical Center. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to Mountain Valley Hospice and Palliative Care, 401 Technology Lane, Suite 200, Mount Airy, NC 27030, or to the charity of the donors choice. Online condolences may be made at www.moodyfuneralservices.com.

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