County science fair shows diversity in projects


First Posted: 12/4/2009

Possible future scientists were on display at their best Thursday night for the Surry County Schools science fair.
After much effort and preparation, the top projects from each school in grades three through 12 gathered at Meadowview Middle School for the countywide science fair where their work was pitted against the best from the other schools in their age category.
Students were responsible for creating a presentation board and answering the questions of a judging panel who came through each of the three rooms to determine which projects would take the top honors.
The projects this year were varied and dealt with every topic from training horses to soil quality to pollution.
In the elementary division, which accounted for grades three through five, the winning projects took on everything from hand washing and the H1N1 virus to a dogs toys.
Kelly Hunsucker, a fifth grader at Cedar Ridge Elementary, completed her project on color and temperature in regards to paint. She determined that blue paint reached the highest temperature while silver paint reached the lowest. As one of only three students chosen from her school, she was excited to be at the competition and hopes to make a repeat appearance next year in the middle school division.
Molly Slater, a fifth grader at Westfield Elementary, chose to center her project around people. Entitled Help Im Shrinking, her project measured to see if people were shorter at night than they were when they woke up in the morning.
Im nervous, she admitted before the judging started, but said she hopes to return next year.
In the middle school division, there were winners for each of four divisions, earth science, life or biological science, physical science and technology.
Taylor Gabbey, a Meadowview Middle School eighth grader, completed her project in the physical science division and focused on determining whether or not ammonia would fade different types of cloth.
People use ammonia as a cleaner, so I wondered what would happen to the clothes. I tested cotton, fleece and polyester, she said. Surprisingly nothing happened.
Barrett Slate is a sixth grader at Meadowview Middle and competed in the earth science division. He tested three types of rocks and their tendency to weather when water enters the cracks. In All Cracked-Up Rock Weathering, Slate determined that limestone broke apart the most and granite broke apart the least when water expanded in the cracks in the rocks.
I was pretty nervous, he said after his interview process was complete.
However, that nervousness would not keep him from making a return trip next year if presented with the opportunity.
I would use a different material to see which worked faster, he said when asked if he would do anything differently.
The high school division divided students in ninth through 12th grade into categories for earth science, life or biological science, physical science and team projects. There were no entries for technology.
Isabella Gillespie teamed up with Taylor Coalson from North Surry High to complete a project on the effects of oil in water. According to the duo, there are 62 million cars on the road right now and about 30 percent of the oil used in those cars is illegally dumped, causing pollution in the water supply. If the amount of pollution continues to increase, it could kill off life on earth by depleting the fresh water supply.
To test their theory, they put oil in a jar of water and let it sit. The result was foul-smelling water complete with a white growth. The oil caused the pH of the water to go up, killing off the bacteria and making it unfit for drinking.
Kayla Riska, a ninth grader at North Surry, completed a project on how location in a river affects the amount of suspended sediment in the water. She learned that the location that has smaller sediment at the bottom of the river has more suspended sediment compared to those locations with large rocks.
I was so nervous, she said after leaving the judging area. But I would probably come back.
In the elementary division, first place went to Eli Williams and Ellie Kidd, both fourth graders at Dobson Elementary, for their project entitled H1N1 Hand Washing Public Awareness.
Two second place ribbons were awarded. One went to Anna Grace Senter, a fifth grader at Dobson Elementary, for her project entitled Maxs Toy Test, while the other went to John Wingo Jr., a fourth grader at Shoals Elementary with a project entitled The Zoomer.
Klaudia Tucker, a fifth grader at Shoals Elementary with a projected entitled 3,2,1 Blast Off and Jacob Banks, a third grader from Westfield Elementary with a project entitled Icy Cold Pop both took home third place ribbons.
Kelly Hunsucker, a fifth grader at Cedar Ridge Elementary, won fourth place with her project called Color and Temperature.
In the middle school division for earth science, Brooke Tonnesen, a seventh grader at Gentry Middle, won first place for her project on Fisher River Focus. Ethan Doby, an eighth grader from Central Middle, won second place for Water, Pond, Rain, City, and/or Bottled Water. Andrew Hegler, a seventh grader at Central Middle, took home third for Spill Solutions. Barrett Slate, a sixth grader at Meadowview Middle, won fourth for All Cracked-Up Rock Weathering.
In the middle school life or biological science division, Emily Chilton and Lindsey Badgett, eighth graders at Pilot Mountain Middle, won first place for Is the Size Write? Corbin Willard, seventh grader at Meadowview Middle, won second for Youve Got 5 Seconds. Lindsey Smith, seventh grader at Pilot Mountain Middle, won third for Stroop Effect. Petra Goettel, a sixth grader at Gentry Middle, took home fourth place for Television Trouble.
In the physical science division for middle school, Kelsey Taylor, a seventh grader at Central Middle, won first place for Which Type of 10W30 Motor Oil Performs the Best. Taylor Gabbey, an eighth grader at Meadowview Middle, won second place for Fade Away. Meagan Soetermans, an eighth grader at Pilot Mountain Middle, took home third for Colors and Heat Absorption. Jaden Gentry, a sixth grader at Meadowview Middle, won fourth for Spud Power.
In the technology division for middle school, Austin Mundy, seventh grader at Meadowview Middle, won first for Is the Bunny More Band for Your Buck? Sara Richardson, eighth grader at Genty Middle, took home second for Leaky Clues to Dam Design. Abby Callaway, seventh grader at Central Middle, won third for Its Hot in Here. Scott Meredith, eighth grader at Pilot Mountain Middle, won fourth for Does the Grade Make a Difference?
For the high school earth science division, Kayla Riska, ninth grader at North Surry, won first place for Down By the Riverside. Anna Martin, 10th grader at Surry Central, won second for Does Runoff Affect Plant Growth? Keri Fulp, ninth grader at East Surry, took home third for Dam Effect. Jordan Miller, 10th grader at East Surry, took home fourth for Salt/Sugar Effects on Grass.
In the life or biological science division for high school, Heather Key, ninth grader at Surry Central, won first place for Which type of Fruit/Vegetable Produces the Most Electricity? Rebecca George, 11th grader at East Surry, took home second for Eat Green, Save the World. Hudson Collins, 10th grader at East Surry, won third place for Red Bull Gives You…Webs? Will Pfitzner, 10th grader at Surry Early College, won fourth for The Purification and Large Scale Production of VPR-GFP and 515-m-Cherry Plasmids in E-coli Strain DH5-9.
In the physical science division, Trevor Maxwell Henley, 12th grader at North Surry, won first place for V Grooves vs. U Grooves. Ashley Jessup, 10th grader at East Surry, took home second for Whats in Your Pond. Megan Gillespie, ninth grader at Surry Central, won third for Gas and Go. Asia Harold, 10th grader at Surry Early College, won fourth for Cool States of Matter.
In the team division for high school, Isabella Gillespie and Taylor Coalson, 10th graders at North Surry, won first with Go Green. Lauren Henderson and Brittany Mauch, ninth graders at Surry Early College, won second with D-Tale.
Contact Morgan Wall at [email protected] or 719-1929.

comments powered by Disqus