Another casino night around the corner


By Andy Winemiller - [email protected]



From left, Bettye Barrett, Claire Merritt, Mary Higgs, Paul Madren and Derek Higgs play blackjack at the 2015 Casino Royale event.


Submitted photos | Tilley’s Photo

Hank Spires and John Hollingsworth preside over the draw-down at a prior Casino Royale event.


Submitted photos | Tilley’s Photo

The Mount Airy Museum of Regional History is set to hold its major fundraiser next week.

On Sept. 17 the museum will hold its fifth-annual Casino Royale night at Cross Creek Country Club. The event will feature casino-like gaming, a dinner and a draw-down raffle.

“We anticipate netting between $25,000 and $30,000 at the event,” said Matt Edwards, museum executive director. “That is north of 10 percent of our annual operating budget.”

More than 150 people are expected to turn out for the Casino Royale night.

The evening, which begins at 6:30 p.m. and ends at 11 p.m. caters to a wide array of people, said Edwards. Though roulette, craps and blackjack tables will litter the banquet hall at the country club, one doesn’t need to be an avid gambler to enjoy the games.

“If you don’t know how to play, the professionals running the table will teach you,” explained Edwards.

Everybody who attends the event receives a $10,000 chip, which is, of course, not representative of any real money, said Edwards. At the end of the night, the single person with the biggest stack will receive a cash prize. The “fake” money used to play can lead to some interesting gambling decisions.

“You are gambling with play money,” said Edwards. “Once they get past the mental block and realize it’s not real money, people make some crazy bets.”

The gaming is second only to the night’s main event, said Edwards. A draw-down raffle could leave one person standing at the end of the night, and that person’s pockets will be $6,000 heavier. That stated, finalists in the draw-down could opt to split the pot.

A draw-down ticket sells for $100.

There will also be other festivities associated with the event. A portion of the night will feature an open bar, while a cash bar will fill the remainder of the evening. Food will be served, and live entertainment is provided.

Edwards said the event’s silent auction is not something to miss.

“There will be weekend packages, a zip-lining experience and craft beer packages,” noted Edwards. “It will be a great opportunity to bid on a full spectrum of good stuff.”

Those who purchase tickets for the draw-down have the opportunity to purchase attendance tickets to the event as well. A draw-down ticket, plus one admission ticket is $150. A draw-down ticket and two admissions is $200.

Tickets for the event alone — without the draw-down ticket — may be purchased for $65 per person.

Edwards said one question he often receives about Casino Royale is regarding a dress code for the event.

“It is black tie-optional — and I really mean optional,” explained Edwards. “The original intent was to give people who wanted to a reason to dress up, but you’ll see everything from khakis to white dinner coats.”

Edwards said tickets may be purchased at the museum 301 North Main St. or from any museum board member. Museum staff may be reached at 336-786-4478.

From left, Bettye Barrett, Claire Merritt, Mary Higgs, Paul Madren and Derek Higgs play blackjack at the 2015 Casino Royale event.
http://mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/web1_3.jpgFrom left, Bettye Barrett, Claire Merritt, Mary Higgs, Paul Madren and Derek Higgs play blackjack at the 2015 Casino Royale event. Submitted photos | Tilley’s Photo

Hank Spires and John Hollingsworth preside over the draw-down at a prior Casino Royale event.
http://mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/web1_8.jpgHank Spires and John Hollingsworth preside over the draw-down at a prior Casino Royale event. Submitted photos | Tilley’s Photo

By Andy Winemiller

[email protected]

Andy is a staff writer and may be reached at 415-4698.

Andy is a staff writer and may be reached at 415-4698.

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