Master Gardeners offer fall classes


Staff report



This photo from the Cooperative Extension Service shows an example of an edible permaculture landscape.


Submitted photos

This vegetable garden is part of an edible landscape.


Submitted photos

This herb spiral is an example of folding space and stacking functions in permaculture.


Submitted photos

Amaranth plants are both ornamental and edible. The leaves can be eaten as a green, like spinach, and the seeds can be used as a grain.


Submitted photos

DOBSON — The Surry County Master Gardener Volunteers are hosting a practical, inspirational and environmentally conscientious lineup of fall gardening classes.

These classes are filled with information designed to help newcomers get started and intermediate gardeners increase productivity, while even offering experts insights into interesting plants and innovative planting methods.

Contrary to popular belief, spring is not the best time to start a garden. For best results in soil preparation, planning and planting perennials, fall is the best time to get a garden growing. Before digging in, save time and money by spending a few evenings gaining insights from the Masters.

Classes are held from 6-8 p.m. on the dates shown below, at the Surry County Extension office located at 210 N. Main St. Dobson, NC 27017. Call (336) 401-8025 to reserve a seat and copies of printed course materials.

Aug. 1

Fall Vegetable Gardening — Surry County weather and climate conditions can be a little unpredictable in fall. But with a conscientious planning, careful plant selection, and good timing, folks can cut their grocery bill by growing nutritious, delicious and fresh vegetables well into winter. Learn what works and how to navigate challenges with expert advice from long-time local gardeners dedicated to growing great edibles.

Aug. 8

Edible Landscaping — Ready to grow beyond the vegetable garden? Consider planting an edible landscape. Learn how to adapt traditional landscape design practices to plan, plant, and grow one’s own exciting and exotic edible paradise. By diverting the garden budget to plants that are both decorative and delicious, people can save money in the long run, create natural habitat for endangered pollinators, and enjoy greater food security and nutritional diversity just outside the door.

Aug. 15

Permaculture 101 — People Care. Earth Care. Fair Share. Do those concepts sound like good living?

Then come find out how growing a garden using powers of observation and some surprisingly simple ideas can help grow many of the resources people need for the good life, such as food, herbs and building materials.

As an added bonus, we’ll talk about how those techniques can enhance ecological restoration and encourage community. We’ll touch on ideas relating to soil erosion control, water management, keyhole gardens, herb spirals, self-renewing fruit tree based plant guilds, and help folks discover how ecological thinking can help cut their dependence on purchased inputs such as pesticides and fertilizers.

Aug. 29

It’s a Wrap: Garden Clean-Up and Cover Crops — As long-time Master Gardener Volunteer Judy Bates says “You’re going to have a cover crop, whether you plant one or not.”

Bare soil is a weed patch waiting to happen. Come learn how to use cover crops to increase the biological life in the soil, prevent erosion, and manage weed and pest problems to maximize a garden’s growing capacity year after year.

Also, hear about best practices related to garden clean-up and tool maintenance to set you up for success next year.

For those ready to take your gardening to the next level, consider becoming a Master Gardener Volunteer. Through a rigorous 40-hour training program, and with the support of a community of fellow volunteers, participants can become a Master Gardener and serve their own communities by helping others to grow more and better.

Become part of a green revolution happening right here in Surry County. Find more details here: https://surry.ces.ncsu.edu/site-surry-1/ or contact the Extension office at (336) 401-8025.

This photo from the Cooperative Extension Service shows an example of an edible permaculture landscape.
http://mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/web1_Edible-1.jpgThis photo from the Cooperative Extension Service shows an example of an edible permaculture landscape. Submitted photos

This vegetable garden is part of an edible landscape.
http://mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/web1_Edible-3.jpgThis vegetable garden is part of an edible landscape. Submitted photos

This herb spiral is an example of folding space and stacking functions in permaculture.
http://mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/web1_Edible-2.jpgThis herb spiral is an example of folding space and stacking functions in permaculture. Submitted photos

Amaranth plants are both ornamental and edible. The leaves can be eaten as a green, like spinach, and the seeds can be used as a grain.
http://mtairynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/web1_Edible-4.jpgAmaranth plants are both ornamental and edible. The leaves can be eaten as a green, like spinach, and the seeds can be used as a grain. Submitted photos

Staff report

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