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Cookin’ up Cookies

By Lucie R. Willsie Lifestyle Reporter

8 months 17 days 15 hours ago |1492 Views | | | Email | Print
Sabrina Wilmoth teaches the Food Classes at Surry Central High School. This students seen here were learning how to make, as well as decorate, holiday cookies. From left are Trey Harbour, a senior; Julie Wall, a junior; Samantha VanHoy, a freshman; Ellen Hunter, a sophomore; Ambria Talley, a freshman; and Austin Venable, also a freshman.
Sabrina Wilmoth teaches the Food Classes at Surry Central High School. This students seen here were learning how to make, as well as decorate, holiday...
Austin Venable, a freshman, is making an extremely intricate design on one of his “ghostly” holiday cookies. He combined what he learned about decorating cookies in Sabrina Wilmoth's Food Class at Surry Central High School with his creative imagination.
Austin Venable, a freshman, is making an extremely intricate design on one of his “ghostly” holiday cookies. He combined what he learned a...
Many other creative designs were made recently in Sabrina Wilmoth's Food Class at Surry Central High School on making Rolled Sugar Cookies with Color-Flow Icing.
Many other creative designs were made recently in Sabrina Wilmoth's Food Class at Surry Central High School on making Rolled Sugar Cookies with Color-...
Here are some other cookie creations.
Here are some other cookie creations.
And more still cookie creations are seen here.
And more still cookie creations are seen here.
And the biggest trick that Sabrina Wilmoth taught the students was the importance of first outlining the outside of the cookies with the icing before starting to decorate and get fancy with other designs. The outline kept the rest of the icing and decorations on top of the cookie and prevented it from flowing over the edges.
And the biggest trick that Sabrina Wilmoth taught the students was the importance of first outlining the outside of the cookies with the icing before ...
These cookies were given out to folks at the school in celebration of the recent and upcoming holidays.
These cookies were given out to folks at the school in celebration of the recent and upcoming holidays.
Two students from Sabrina Wilmoth's food class are using another decoration technique using a pastry bag to decorate some holiday cookies. In the foreground is Samantha VanHoy, a freshman, and in the background is Matt Inman, a junior.
Two students from Sabrina Wilmoth's food class are using another decoration technique using a pastry bag to decorate some holiday cookies. In the fore...
A slightly different technique is required when using a pastry bag. The decorator has to be both quick, as well as have a steady hand to outline the cookie properly before the flow-icing becomes too dense to use.
A slightly different technique is required when using a pastry bag. The decorator has to be both quick, as well as have a steady hand to outline the c...
After the cookie is outlined and the icing is set, Julie Wall, a junior, demonstrates here how to fill in and decorate by using a toothpick.
After the cookie is outlined and the icing is set, Julie Wall, a junior, demonstrates here how to fill in and decorate by using a toothpick.
Another trick is to squeeze some icing directly from a large bottle of icing when trying to cover larger areas of the same color.
Another trick is to squeeze some icing directly from a large bottle of icing when trying to cover larger areas of the same color.
Sabrina Wilmoth, teacher of the food classes at Surry Central High School in Dobson, helps, from left, students Caleb Shelton, a sophomore, Edgar Gonzalez, a sophomore, and Trey Harbour, a senior, during a recent class on how to make and decorate holiday cookies.
Sabrina Wilmoth, teacher of the food classes at Surry Central High School in Dobson, helps, from left, students Caleb Shelton, a sophomore, Edgar Gonz...
These two students from the cooking classes at Surry Central first learned how to make cookies in these classes. From left are: Lety Armenta, a freshman, and Jenni Mendez, also a freshman.
These two students from the cooking classes at Surry Central first learned how to make cookies in these classes. From left are: Lety Armenta, a freshm...
Another project the food classes learned recently was how to make holiday decorations out of “fake” bread dough like these displayed in this bowl. Although they look good enough to eat, they are only to be used for a holiday display.
Another project the food classes learned recently was how to make holiday decorations out of “fake” bread dough like these displayed in th...
Two of the students that helped create the holiday decorations out of “fake” bread dough were, from left, Madison Cockerham, a freshman, and Tara Dillow, a sophomore.
Two of the students that helped create the holiday decorations out of “fake” bread dough were, from left, Madison Cockerham, a freshman, a...

Well, it’s that time of year again.


It’s time for powdered sugar and icing and fanciful cookies.


It’s time for chocolate and fudge and whipped cream.


It’s time for the dazzling look, the sweet, delectable taste, and the delightful aroma of specialty holiday cookies.


“And we’ve done tons of cookie recipes,” said Sabrina Wilmoth, teacher of the food classes at Surry Central High School. “But there’s going to be a lot more cookie making going on the rest of this year.”


In fact, it is a new experience many of the students in these classes, according to students Lety Armenta, in ninth grade, and Jenni Mendez, also in ninth.


“It’s the first time I’m making cookies,” Armenta said. “It’s fun. We especially learned how to make sure to decorate them right so they’ll look pretty. They even tastes better when they look pretty.”


Mendez also never made cookies until she learned how in the food classes at school


“I especially learned about all the colors you can use on one cookie,” Mendez said. “And how you have to outline the cookies first — within 3 minutes or the color-flow icing gets too hard to work with — and then how to use filler icing in the middle.”


Using their own unique creativity to make unique designs was a distinct second pleasure in making these cookies, both the ladies said. That’s why these color-flow icing cookies were a lot more fun than the previous drop cookies some of the classes made. These color-flow icing cookies were much more personal and individualized.


But what was particularly enjoyable to them both had nothing to do with the actual baking and decorating.


“It was fun for all of us to work together,” both students said.


Now, both are planning to go home and make more cookies for the holidays.


Two other bakers in Wilmoth’s Food Class took on a different type of holiday baking project.


Tara Dillow, in tenth grade, and Madison Cockerham, in ninth grade, both learned how to braid bread dough, roll bread dough, and how to use scoring techniques to make designs on bread.


Only one thing unusual about these breads.


No one could eat them.


Not because the students did something wrong when baking them.


No. They intentionally made the bread so it couldn’t be eaten.


These breads were made with, let’s call it “fake” dough, so the breads made could be used for holiday decorations and centerpieces for holiday get-togethers.


“They’ll be making the real deal in the near future,” Wilmoth said. In fact, the food classes are scheduled to make Amish Bread for upcoming holiday faculty events.


And, when they are making the “real deal,” Wilmoth said, the one thing bakers need to know how to do to make great bread is to know exactly how long to bake the bread. This is the hardest and most crucial aspect of bread making.


“But making cookies is harder than it looks as well,” Dillow said.


For example, one of the crucial aspects in making the actual cookies, before decorating them with icing, is how the dough is rolled out.


“Start from the center out,” Cockerham said. “If you don’t, the edges will break.”


Also, make sure there is enough — but not too much — flour on the dough and the rolling pin or the edges will tear. The dough shouldn’t stick but also shouldn’t be too dough, just right.


Another trick in making tasty cookie dough is to make sure the butter is at room temperature. By putting it out about 30 minutes before wanting to mix it with the flour mixture should do the trick.


“If not, the dough will be crumbly,” Dillow said.


And the third “trick” is to make sure the oven is properly preheated before putting the unbaked cookie dough into the oven.


“That’s very important,” Cockerham said.


RECIPES


ROLLED SUGAR COOKIES


(AND COLOR-FLOW ICING)


FROM THE SURRY CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL FOODS CLASSES


INGREDIENTS


1 ½ cups of butter, softened


2 cups of white sugar


4 eggs


1 teaspoon of vanilla extract


5 cups of all-purpose flour


2 teaspoons of baking powder


1 teaspoon of salt


DIRECTIONS


In a large bowl, cream together the butter and the sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs and the vanilla. Stir in the flour, baking powder, and salt. Cover, and chill the dough for at least one hour. Preheat the oven to 400-degrees Fahrenheit. Roll out the dough on a floured surface 1/4- to 1/2-inch thick. Cut into shapes with cookie cutter. Place cookies 1 inch apart on ungreased cookie sheets. Bake 6 to 8 minutes in a preheated oven. Cool completely.


COLOR-FLOW ICING


INGREDIENTS


1/4 cup + 1 teaspoon water


4 cups of confectioner’s sugar, sifted


2 Tablespoons of Wilton Color Flow Mix


DIRECTIONS


With an electric mixer, blend all the ingredients on low speed for 5 minutes. If using a hand mixer, use high speed. Color-flow icing crusts quickly, so keep bowl covered with a damp cloth while using. Stir in desired icing color. Makes approximately 2 cups color-flow icing.


LINZER COOKIES


FROM THE INTERNET


INGREDIENTS


1 1/4 cups of butter, softened


1 cup of powdered sugar, sifted


2 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour


1/2 cup of finely chopped pecans, toasted


1/4 teaspoon of salt


1/4 teaspoon of ground cloves


1/4 teaspoon pf ground cinnamon


1 teaspoon of grated lemon rind


1/4 cup of seedless raspberry jam


Powdered sugar


DIRECTIONS


Beat the butter at medium speed with an electric mixer. Gradually add 1 cup of powdered sugar, beating until light and fluffy. Combine the flour with the pecans, salt, cloves, cinnamon and lemon rind. Gradually add this mixture to the butter mixture, beating just until blended. Divide the dough into 2 equal portions. Cover and chill for 1 hour. Roll each portion to a 1/8-inch thickness on a lightly floured surface. Cut with a 3-inch, star-shaped cutter. Cut centers out of half of cookies with a 1 1/2-inch star-shaped cutter. Place all stars on lightly greased baking sheets. Bake at 325-degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. Cool on wire racks. Spread the solid cookies with jam. Sprinkle the remaining stars with powdered sugar. Top each solid cookie with a hollow star.


ARTIFICIAL OR FAKE BREAD FOR DECORATION OR DISPLAY


FROM THE SURRY CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL FOODS CLASSES


INGREDIENTS


4 cups of flour


1 cup of salt


1 1/2 - 2 cups of water


DIRECTIONS


Mix together the flour, salt, and water in a mixing bowl. Knead the fake, inedible bread dough the same way you would real edible bread dough. Work the dough into the desired shape. Bake until it brown in a 300-degree Fahrenheit oven.


AMARETTO BUTTER COOKIES


FROM THE INTERNET


INGREDIENTS


1 cup ( or 1/2 pound) of butter or margarine at room temperature


1 cup of sugar


1 large egg, separated


3 Tablespoons of almond-flavored liqueur, such as amaretto, or 1 Tablespoon of almond extract


2 teaspoons of grated orange peel


About 2 cups of all-purpose flour


1/2 teaspoon of baking powder


1/4 teaspoon of salt


1 1/4 cups of sliced almonds


DIRECTIONS


In a large bowl, with a mixer on medium speed, beat 1 cup of butter and sugar until smooth. Add the egg yolk, liqueur, and orange peel and beat until well blended. In another bowl, mix the 2 cups flour, baking powder, and salt. Add to the butter mixture. Stir to mix, then beat until well blended. Gather the dough into a ball, divide in half, and flatten each portion into a disk. Wrap each tightly in plastic wrap and freeze until firm enough to roll without sticking, or about 30 minutes. Unwrap the dough. On a lightly floured surface, with a floured rolling pin, roll one disk at a time to about 1/4-inch thick. With a floured, 2-inch round cutter, cut out the cookies. Place about 2 inches apart on a buttered 12- by 15-inch baking sheets. Gather excess dough into a ball, reroll, and cut out remaining cookies. In a small bowl, beat egg white with 1 teaspoon water to blend. Brush the cookies with mixture and sprinkle or arrange about 1/2 teaspoon sliced almonds on each. Bake the cookies in a 325-degree Fahrenheit regular or convection oven until lightly browned, or about 15 minutes. Let cookies cool on sheets for 5 minutes, then transfer to racks to cool completely.


LITTLE WREATHS


FROM “SANTA’S FAVORITE COOKIES”


INGREDIENTS


1 butter-flavor Crisco stick or 1 cup of butter flavor Crisco all-vegetable shortening


1 cup of confectioners’ sugar


2 hard-boiled egg yokes, mashed


2 eggs, separated


1 teaspoon of vanilla


1 teaspoon of almond extract


2 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour


Green colored sugar crystals


24 red candied cherries, cut into halves


DIRECTIONS


Combine 1 cup of shortening and confectioners’ sugar in a large bowl. Beat at a medium speed with an electric mixer until well blended. Beat in the hard-boiled egg yolks, uncooked egg yolks, vanilla and almond extract. Beat in the flour, 1/4 cup at a time, until well blended. Cover and refrigerate for 3 hours. Let the dough stand at room temperature until it becomes easy to handle. Heat the oven to 350-degrees Fahrenheit. Divide the dough into 2 equal portions. Cut each portion into 24 equal pieces. Shape each piece of dough into a 5-inch-long rope. Form each rope into a wreath or loop 1 1/2 inches apart on an ungreased cookie sheet, overlapping both ends. Brush each wreath with beaten egg whites. Sprinkle with colored sugar crystals. Lightly press a cherry piece into the top of each wreath. Bake at 350-degrees Fahrenheit for 10 to 12 minutes or until the edges are lightly browned. Cool on cookie sheets for 3 minutes. Transfer to cooling racks to cool completely.


MORAVIAN WAFERS


FROM THE INTERNET


INGREDIENTS


5.6 ounces of all-purpose flour (or about 1 1/4 cups)


3/4 teaspoon of ground cinnamon


3/4 teaspoon of ground ginger


1/2 teaspoon of white pepper


1/2 teaspoon of ground cloves


1/2 teaspoon of dry mustard


1/4 teaspoon of salt


1/4 teaspoon of baking soda


1/4 teaspoon of ground allspice


1/3 cup of molasses


3 Tablespoons of butter, softened


2 Tablespoons of brown sugar


Cooking spray


DIRECTIONS


Preheat the oven to 350-degrees Fahrenheit. Lightly spoon the flour into dry measuring cups and level with a knife. Combine the flour and the cinnamon, ginger, pepper, cloves, dry mustard, salt, baking soda and allspice, stirring with a whisk. Next, place the molasses, butter, and sugar in a large bowl. Beat with a mixer at high speed for 2 minutes. Add the flour mixture and beat just until blended. The dough will be crumbly. Divide the dough into 4 equal portions. Place each portion on a sheet of wax paper. Cover with plastic wrap. Roll each portion to a 1/8-inch thickness. Freeze for 10 minutes. Remove the plastic wrap. Cut with a 2 1/2-inch round cutter. Place cookies on baking sheets coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350-degrees Fahrenheit for 6 minutes or until the edges of cookies are browned. Cool for 5 minutes on baking sheets. Remove from baking sheets and cool completely on wire racks. Repeat the procedure until the dough is all used.


GINGERBREAD PEOPLE


FROM THE INTERNET


INGREDIENTS


COOKIES


2 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour (or about 10 ounces)


1 1/2 teaspoons of ground ginger


1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon


1/2 teaspoon of baking powder


1/4 teaspoon of baking soda


1/4 teaspoon of salt


1/4 teaspoon of ground nutmeg


1/4 teaspoon of ground cloves


3/4 cup of granulated sugar


1/4 cup of butter, softened


1/2 cup of molasses


1 large egg


DECORATIONS


1 1/4 cups of powdered sugar


2 Tablespoons of 2-percent milk


1/4 cup of colored sugar sprinkles


DIRECTIONS


To prepare the cookies, lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups and level with a knife. Combine the flour and the ginger, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, salt, nutmeg and cloves in a large bowl, stirring with a whisk. Place the granulated sugar and butter in a large bowl and beat with a mixer at medium speed until smooth and well blended. Add the molasses and the egg and beat until well blended. Stir the flour mixture into the sugar mixture until well blended. Divide the dough in half. Shape each dough portion into a flat disk. Wrap the dough portions separately in plastic wrap;. Chill for 1 hour or until firm. Preheat the oven to 350-degrees Fahrenheit. Remove 1 dough portion from the refrigerator. Remove the plastic wrap. Roll the dough to a 1/8-inch thickness on a floured surface. Cut with a 3-inch boy or girl cookie cutter. Place the cookies 1/2 inch apart on parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Repeat this procedure with the remaining dough portion. Bake at 350-degrees Fahrenheit for 11 minutes or until the edges of the cookies are lightly browned. Remove from the pans. Cool completely on wire racks.


To prepare the decorations, combine the powdered sugar and milk, stirring until smooth. Spoon this mixture into a heavy-duty, zip-top plastic bag. Snip a tiny hole in 1 corner of bag. Pipe onto cookies. Decorate as desired with sugar sprinkles.


ORNAMENT COOKIES


FROM “SANTA’S FAVORITE COOKIES”


INGREDIENTS


2 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour


1/4 teaspoon of salt


1 cup of sugar


3/4 cup or 1 1/2 sticks of butter, softened


1 egg


1 teaspoon of vanilla


1 teaspoon of almond extract


ICING


2 cups powdered sugar


2 Tablespoons of milk


(1 teaspoon of additional milk might be required.)


Assorted candies and decors, to taste, as desired


DIRECTIONS


COOKIES


To make the cookies, combine the flour and salt in a medium bowl. Beat the sugar and butter in a large bowl with an electric mixer at medium speed until light and fluffy. Beat in the egg, vanilla, and almond extract. Gradually add the flour mixture, beating until well blended. Divide dough in half. Cover and refrigerate 30 minutes or until firm. Preheat the oven to 350-degrees Fahrenheit. Working with 1 portion at a time, roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut the dough into desired shapes with assorted floured cookie cutters. Place the cutouts on ungreased cookie sheets. Using a drinking straw or the tip of a sharp knife, cut a hole near the top of each cookie to allow for a piece of ribbon or string to be inserted for a hanger. Bake 10 to 12 minutes or until the edges are golden brown. Let the cookies stand on cookie sheets for 1 minute. Remove to wire racks to cool completely.


ICING


Combine the powdered sugar and 2 Tablespoons of milk in a small bowl. Stir until smooth. Baker’s note: Icing will be thick. And, if too thick, add 1 teaspoon of additional milk. Divide this mixture into small bowls and tint with food coloring as desired.


CRANBERRY ALMOND COOKIES


FROM THE INTERNET


INGREDIENTS


1 cup of butter, softened


3/4 cup of sugar


3/4 cup of firmly packed light brown sugar


1/2 teaspoon of almond extract


2 large eggs


2 1/4 cups of all-purpose flour


1 teaspoon of baking powder


1 teaspoon of salt


2 cups of chopped fresh cranberries


1 cup of slivered almonds, toasted


DIRECTIONS


Beat the butter at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add the sugars, beating well. Add the almond extract and the eggs, beating until blended. Combine the flour, baking powder, and salt. Gradually add this mixture to the butter mixture, beating at low speed until blended after each addition. Stir in the cranberries and almonds. Drop by rounded Tablespoonfuls onto ungreased baking sheets. Bake at 375-degrees Fahrenheit for 9 to 11 minutes. Remove to wire racks to cool. Baker’s note: You can freeze the baked cookies for up to 6 months.


FRUITCAKE DROP COOKIES


FROM THE INTERNET


INGREDIENTS


3/4 cup of sugar


1/4 cup of unsalted butter, at room temperature


2 eggs


1/4 teaspoon of salt


1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract


1/2 teaspoon of lemon juice


1/4 teaspoon of ground cinnamon


1 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour


1/2 cup of candied red cherries


1/2 cup of candied green cherries


1 cup of dried pineapple pieces


2 cups of pecans, roughly chopped


DIRECTIONS


Preheat the oven to 300-degrees Fahrenheit. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar using a hand mixer. Add the eggs, salt, vanilla, lemon, and cinnamon and mix until well incorporated. Slowly add the flour and mix well. Fold in the fruit and pecans. Drop by rounded Tablespoonfuls onto a greased cookie sheet. Bake for 23 to 25 minutes. Allow to cool completely.


COCONUT MACAROONS


FROM THE INTERNET


INGREDIENTS


2 egg whites, stiffly beaten


2/3 cup of sweetened condensed milk


1/8 teaspoon of salt


1 teaspoon of almond extract


3 cups of shredded coconut


1 teaspoon of cream of tarter


DIRECTIONS


Preheat the oven to 350-degrees Fahrenheit. Combine the coconut, extract and salt. Mix in the condensed milk to form a thick paste. Fold in the egg whites with the cream of tarter. Drop teaspoonfuls onto greased cookie sheets, about 2 inches apart. Bake for about 8 minutes or until edges are lightly browned.


PECAN TARTS


FROM THE INTERNET


INGREDIENTS


1 cup, or 2 sticks, of butter, softened


1/2 cup of confectioners’ sugar, plus more for coating cookies


1 teaspoon of vanilla extract


1 3/4 cups of all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting hands


1 cup of chopped pecans, very small pieces


DIRECTIONS


Preheat the oven to 270-degrees Fahrenheit. Line the cookie sheets with parchment paper. Using an electric mixer at low speed, cream the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the vanilla. At low speed, gradually add the flour. Mix in the pecans with a spatula. With floured hands, take out about 1 Tablespoon of dough and shape it into crescent. Place the cookies 1-inch apart on the prepared cookie sheets. Baker’s Note: Continue to dust your hands with flour as you make more cookies. Bake for 40 minutes. Dust with additional confectioners’ sugar while still warm. Cool completely on wire racks and store in airtight containers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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